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Severe Congestion at U.S. West Coast Ports- Supply Chain Matters Update Three

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We are a mere two weeks before the Black Friday holiday shopping kick-off, and a mere six weeks before the actual Christmas holiday and the severe congestion that is crippling U.S. west coast ports essentially remains the same.

In last week’s Supply Chain Matters commentary we described what many are calling the “perfect storm” of supply chain disruption. Another week later, the crisis is cascading across industry and transportation channels, affecting both imports as well as time-sensitive exports.  An NBC News broadcast  in the U.S. notes that as of yesterday, 13 ships are anchored off the coast waiting to be unloaded and describes container shipping at “full stop”. While that may be a bit of journalistic sensationalism, it is descriptive.

The on-the-ground realities seem little changed from last week’s situation.

Public finger-pointing among the ILWU labor union and the Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) has become a public spectacle vs. any perceived constructive progress. Union officials continue to point to chronic shortages of truck chassis, the impact of having to unload far larger container ships and rail bottlenecks. Meanwhile, at least one container shipping line, U.S. Lines, is placing a Port Congestion Surcharge, effective November 17, amounting to $800 for a twenty-foot container and $1000 for a 40-foot container.  That is sure to add additional heartburn for retailers and manufacturers alike.

A published report from the Journal of Commerce reports that air freight forwarders with operations in the Asia Pacific region are observing space shortages with shipping costs rising dramatically. That should not be a complete surprise considering that Apple and other consumer electronics providers had previously locked-up air freight capacity to overcome their own production backlogs.

The National Retail Federation (NRF) continues to lobby for the personal intervention of President Obama but that effort, even if it did occur, is unlikely to relieve the current congestion any time soon.

As we stated last week, regardless of the finger-pointing, the situation is indeed the perfect storm scenario that many had feared and industry supply chains need to deal with the current realities. Noted in this week’s Wal-Mart commentary, retailers have already kicked-off holiday promotional merchandising and are de-emphasizing the singular Black Friday shopping event in favor of a steady stream of promotions extending through the end of November and probably well into December.

Last year, UPS, and to some extent FedEx, were thrown under the proverbial bus by retailers for non-performance at the most critical time period. In 2014, the creditability of west coast ports and indeed the surface shipping industry is inching closer to being the Grinch’s of Christmas.

Bob Ferrari


Alibaba’s Enormous Online Commerce Potential

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Supply Chain Matters provides a brief contrast to our prior posted commentary regarding Wal-Mart’s efforts to spread out holiday promotions in the coming holiday surge. The Wall Street Journal reports that yesterday, which was China’s celebration of Singles’ Day, online provider Alibaba set a record for China’s largest online shopping day.  The online provider’s various online properties processed a reported $9.3 billion in sales, most likely the equivalent to the Black Friday or Cyber Monday shopping holidays in the United States.

The WSJ notes that last year, Alibaba processed $5.9 billion in Singles’ Day sales. China’s premiere online provider also offered a number of pre-holiday promotions which allowed consumers to order ahead of time and complete their sales transaction on the holiday.  Keep in mind that for the most part, Chinese consumers shun the use of credit cards in favor of cash or mobile based payments.

In its fiscal year ending in March, Alibaba recorded the equivalent of $275 billion in various online sales which the WSJ notes is bigger than the combined online sales of Amazon and eBay combined. Included in the information surrounding its recent initial public offering of stock the online provider noted that it is just tapping the enormous potential of its online market.

We can sometimes get enamored with names such as Amazon and Wal-Mart but Alibaba is indeed an evolving player to reckon with in the coming era of online commerce and retail supply chain customer fulfillment.

Bob Ferrari


Wal-Mart Diffuses Black Friday in Favor of Extended Period of Holiday Promotions

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In our ongoing coverage of the current holiday buying surge among online and brick-and-mortar retail supply chains, Supply Chain Matters shares what we believe is some good news.   Wal Mart

Global retailer Wal-Mart indicates that it will abandon its prior emphasis on the singular one-day Black Friday buying holiday and will instead spread promotional incentives over an extended five day period beginning in the last week of November.  By our lens, this is good news for consumers but not so for certain retail competitors.

Wal-Mart’s efforts at spreading out online and in-store buyer incentives allows shoppers greater flexibility to shop for bargains and avoid the craziness and frenzy of Black Friday mobs in stores and online. The retailer’s employees hopefully get some brief time to celebrate the Thanksgiving Holiday with family and friends. Reports indicate that Wal-Mart will extend promotions thru the entire Black Friday weekend, with an additional flurry of bargains on Cyber Monday. The retailer further indicates that it will be matching online prices from its website as well as in its physical stores.

Other retailers including Amazon have scheduled their holiday promotions to begin earlier in November as well. Already, our inbox contains promotional emails for holiday bargains. What thing is certain, the largest online retailers including Wal-Mart and Amazon will be playing even more hardball in holiday promotions.

All of these efforts can hopefully avoid what occurred in 2013, consumers waiting to the very last days and hours prior to the Christmas holiday to make their purchases only to discover the weakest link, the last-mile of delivery from parcel shipping companies. Both FedEx and UPS have been urging retailers to spread out their promotions and avoid multiple delivery network surges. However, UPS anticipates that its peak day will be December 22. 6 days later than what the package delivery firm planned for in 2013. UPS is planning to process 585 million packages in the month of December.

An added dimension this year is the U.S. Postal Service and its efforts to be a more mainstream player in last-minute last mile parcel delivery. A final dimension in 2014 will be how Amazon and Google’s efforts in piloting their own pilot delivery networks fare in supporting or mitigating surge fulfillment periods.

The not so good news concerns retailers who are still scrambling to get inbound inventories moved through highly congested and near dysfunctional U.S. West Coast ports.  With competitive promotional programs about to kick-off, some retailers will have to fess-up to not having inventory to satisfy consumer holiday needs, or be notified by suppliers that inventory is delayed.  

This is all a game of competitive positioning and the stakes are high. Some business and social media outlets, knowing what may be forthcoming, are advising consumers to wait to the very last-minute before initiating holiday gift purchases.  The premise is that certain retailers might be more motivated to offer more attractive bargains once they assess their inventory situation.

Another certainly is that retail and B2C focused S&OP forums and their supporting supply chains can expect a steady stream of intense activity, and perhaps more surprises now and through the end of December.  It will not be pretty and the winners will be those that can plan and anticipate consumer actions and those that can best respond to changing events.

Keep your web browser pointed to Supply Chain Matters for continuing updates and insights regarding the 2014 holiday surge.

Bob Ferrari


Announced JDA and IBM Collaboration for Retail Omni-Channel Support Has Broader Implications

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The synchronization and management of the Omni-channel customer fulfillment experience has fast become a complex problem for retail industry business management and supply chain teams. The added dimensions of taking orders online or from physical stores and fulfilling from multiple channels adds complexity and needs for smarter and more-informed decision-making.  Cost to serve and determining impact to profitability become ever more a challenge.

Yesterday, in conjunction with the Focus Connect 2014 event being held in Barcelona, JDA Software and IBM made a joint announcement that Supply Chain Matters believes demonstrates the ongoing importance and continued evolution of Supply Chain Control Tower (SCCT) support capabilities in the supply chain technology market. This announcement could also portray a possible broader relationship among these two technology providers in the months to come.

The specific announcement involves a joint collaboration among JDA and IBM development teams to address the need to process and fulfill retail industry Omni-channel orders in a more efficient and more intelligent manner. The approach calls for combining the elements of JDA’s warehouse management, demand planning and workforce planning business support capabilities (JDA Intelligent Fulfillment and Labor Productivity) with IBM’s Sterling Distributed Order Management network platform capabilities. In essence, this approach marries elements of supply chain planning and execution with an end-to-end order management and fulfillment platform that connects all channel participants. The combined capability is expected to be offered in either an on premise or cloud deployment option, the latter being supported by IBM’s SoftLayer business arm. The joint development effort is currently underway and according to the announcement, is expected to be available in late spring of 2015.

This author had the opportunity to speak with IBM regarding the joint announcement. Discussions among these two technology providers began in January of this year at the National Retail Federation (NRF) conference. Both companies have a rather strong market presence among global retailers and each was hearing customers speak to the increasingly complex challenges currently manifested in Omni-channel customer fulfillment, including the dynamic aspects of having to manage the tradeoffs of inventory, appropriate fulfillment location, transportation and labor requirement needs.  In May of this year, our Supply Chain Matters commentary associated with attendance at IBM’s Smarter Commerce Summit highlighted the evolving dimensions of Omni-channel and the needs to provide more predictive and prescriptive decision-making capabilities into the process.

The joint press release includes a quote from joint customer Lowe’s Home Improvement, and we were informed that both firms have identified interest from other unnamed retailers as well. Apparently, the original timetable called for announcement of joint product integrating JDA and IBM elements later in 2015, but it was obviously pushed-up to coincide with this week’s JDA customer event.

Our supply chain and B2B business community education series regarding SCCT has articulated that the concepts of control towers involve efforts to bring together supply chain planning and execution business process elements with enhanced intelligence and more predictive decision-making that can be provided in near real-time dimensions.  There have been a number of strategic movements underway among multiple supply chain, enterprise and ERP technology vendors to build, broaden or position SCCT capabilities.  We view this JDA-IBM joint announcement as yet another dimension of such efforts.  JDA has the potential to leverage a broader more feature-rich distributed order network platform that supports more dynamic process parameters while IBM garners access to deeper retail-specific supply chain planning and execution support functionality. We have been informed that JDA is building and architectural framework that supports plug-in capabilities from other vendors, similar to what we have heard from supply chain planning providers such as Steelwedge and its connection to the Salesforce.com platform. Similarly, supply chain business network provider E2open augmented supply chain planning and product management support capabilities with the acquisition of Icon-SCM and Serus Corporation respectively.

As noted in our previous commentaries, IBM has been integrating elements of Sterling order management and B2B messaging capabilities with its IBM Emptoris sourcing and procurement business suite, and has communicated efforts to bring the predictive elements of Watson decision-making to online fulfillment and supply chain synchronization challenges. Thus, the SCCT business process support elements continue to broaden from many dimensions and are a sign of what will transpire from SCCT support technology down the road.

In the meantime, readers and joint JDA and IBM customers should watch the ongoing joint efforts among both providers for further signs of what is to come.  Just like the prior announcement of the partnership among IBM and Apple, both parties provide the potential to remove the information integration burden for today’s highly complex supply chains.

Bob Ferrari

Disclosure: IBM, E2open and Steelwedge have current or prior business relationships with the Ferrari Consulting and Research Group, parent of the Supply Chain Matters blog.

 


Severe Congestion at West Coast Ports- The Perfect Storm Appears

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Supply Chain Matters provides a further update for our global supply chain community of readers regarding the building crisis of congestion that now surrounds U.S. west coast ports. Gantry_Load_2

In last week’s commentary we echoed comments from observers that described a logistical nightmare that could undermine the best laid plans for the all-important holiday fulfillment surge period.  One week later, various media and on-the-ground reports paint a picture indicating that the crisis is worsening and that retailers and manufacturers are well into contingency scenario planning. The situation has further spread to other ports including Seattle and Tacoma, with a report indicating that truck queues at Tacoma stretching several miles long. On this Friday afternoon there is no doubt that Sales and Operations and supply chain execution teams are manning the phones, terminals and supply chain business network systems to figure out their scenario options.

A report this week from business network CNBC clearly points to the confluence of forces undermining this building crisis. Shipping companies and port operators are pointing their fingers at the ILWU labor union for orchestrating work slowdowns in the shadows on ongoing labor contract talks.  A spokesperson for west coast port operator, Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) is quoted as indicating that terminals that had averaged 25-35 moves per hour were experiencing less than 10.  Yesterday, the PMA indicated that the union was not dispatching adequate levels of highly skilled crane operators to unload ships. Union representatives are pointing to a severe shortage of truck chassis and of truck drivers as causes.  As of yesterday, a report indicates that 14 ships are now anchored off Los Angeles and Long Beach waiting for space, double the number of last week.

The National Retail Federation (NRF) is now seeking the personal intervention of President Obama citing an obvious sudden change of tone among the PMA and the ILWU and suggesting a full shutdown of every west coast port may be imminent.

Regardless of the finger-pointing, the situation has fast become the perfect storm scenario that many had feared and industry supply chains need to deal with the realities. This perfect storm has a strong potential to cascade further into the upcoming holiday fulfillment surge, dragging consumer product manufacturers into the effects.  Need we painfully remind our readers that the Black Friday and Cyber Monday shopping events is a mere three weeks from today.

A published report in today’s edition of The Wall Street Journal indicates that Wal-Mart and Kohl’s had shipments arrive earlier than usual, and while caught-up in the current crisis, delays are not having a major impact on current merchandising plans.  In contrast, the parent of Ann Taylor and Loft stores blamed a shortfall of sales in the recently completed quarter because of delayed shipment and the shifting of inbound goods to more expensive airfreight channels. These are all indicators of the impact of proactive risk planning on the part of retailers. However, larger retailers often have the resources to be able to cushion disruption or finance earlier pre-holiday inventory movements than smaller or cash-strapped brick and mortar or online retailers.

We therefore re-iterate that retail supply chains are now too-deep into the holiday execution window with little tolerance or patience for finger-pointing or posturing. Even if labor contract talks were to come to a hasty final agreement, which is now not very likely, it will do little to salvage the current backlogged condition. It will take additional weeks to dig out of the current mess.

Supply chain teams need to be in full-on contingency planning mode since supply chain execution is now the bogey of the all-important holiday business goal revenue attainment. For some retailers, financial survival is at-stake.

The obvious question now turns to making good on critical holiday focused revenue expectations. From our lens, last year’s last-minute shipping snafu’s for destined holiday goods are in-jeopardy of repeating. Retailers who did not plan for the current crisis will have to figure out ways to offload products in December leading to our previously described doomsday scenario- that retailers delay their most aggressive promotions until the very last days before the Christmas holiday when inventory is hopefully in-place.

The west coast port crisis by default, now engages FedEx, UPS and other surface and air carriers as retailers turn the emphasis toward priority movements and just-in-time inventory offload promotions. Further, it will be especially interesting to observe how Amazon, Google, Wal-Mart and other large online players respond or take competitive advantage to the developing logistics perfect storm scenarios.

As for port operators, organized labor, ocean container lines and their logistics partners, best you address and solve the confluence of forces that resulted in this muddle.  Yes, ongoing labor contract negotiations are a factor, but there are other industry shortcomings becoming evident that point to lack of proper surge planning.

Last year, UPS, and to some extent FedEx, were thrown under the proverbial bus by retailers for non-performance at the most critical time period. In 2014, the creditability of west coast ports and indeed the surface shipping industry is at-stake for being the Grinch’s of Christmas.

Bob Ferrari


Supply Chain Matters Impressions from the 2014 Infosys Industry Analyst Meeting

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Note: The following posting was scheduled for posting on November 5, but due to a technical glitch, is now published.

This author has had a business and research coverage relationship with Infosys Limited for over 8 years, and thus I look forward to the invitation to attend the annual Infosys Industry Analyst Summit meeting.

Our Supply Chain Matters impressions of the prior 2013 event can be read at this web link.

I was especially looking forward to this year’s event because the firm has undergone yet another year of considerable change including a host of new senior executive changes. That includes the naming of former SAP CTO Visual Sikka in the role of CEO and Managing Director that occurred in August.

The CEO address was the first and probably most anticipated item of today’s industry analyst briefing agenda.  It was clear that Visual has already placed a different mark on the firm, one that will emphasize even higher levels of technology innovation for clients, but more importantly, a more empowered, critical thinking and skilled based complement of employees. Within his remarks to analysts, Sikka made no mention of SAP or the SAP HANA technology platform which he previously propelled, which is statement of itself toward a new mission and identity.

Make no mistake, CEO Sikka is driving a broader vision as well as a more focused business model for Infosys that includes wide-scale change management implications.  In his remarks, he specifically addressed the feedback he has heard thus far from industry clients, namely the ongoing agenda of more rapid business change, both in core business processes and new business innovation.  He further shared feedback from Infosys employees who desire deeper engagements with clients and broadened opportunities for learning and career growth.  It was very clear to this author that Visual has already begun to make his mark in his first 90 days of leadership.

A series of follow-on keynote sessions focused on renewing core infrastructure and cloud technology services, broader capabilities leveraging Infosys’s EdgeVerve digital platform capabilities for clients, and the leveraging of an innovation services framework that focuses on delivery of client value in faster 3-6 month cycles.

Within Infosys itself, there are capabilities that can train 16,000 employees simultaneously, and those resources are now destined towards empowering employees with added critical thinking and client engagement skills. One example shared is that over a span of 10 days, 5200 employees were recently trained in design-thinking skills.  Plans call for over 30,000 employees to be trained in these skills by the end of the year. New academic partnerships are being focused toward other skill areas that provide the firm’s consultants, developers and contributors with critical thinking and collaborative team skills. This area is highly important because Infosys has undergone a higher level of employee attrition since founder N.R. Narayana Murthy returned from retirement to oversee what he felt were required business and management model changes. That led to a host of executive level departures.

For this analyst, the new Infosys from the persona or its new CEO appears at first blush to be more approachable, more willing to partner, more inclined to leverage open system platforms and be more sensitized to client requirements for quicker bursts of time-to-value in technology innovation.  This is refreshing.

During today’s event, I had the opportunity to view demonstrations of some rather interesting technology efforts already underway.  One was directed in joint work with a certain global car manufacturer in enabling a smarter, safer car driving experience.  We hope to share more visibility to this effort in an upcoming Supply Chain Matters commentary.

Our disappointment today is that specific direction and efforts addressing manufacturing and retail industries were not included within the main keynote agenda. Last year’s briefings have specific emphasis in these areas which leads us concerned that these industries may take a back seat to other strategic industry sector initiatives. One-on-one interviews validated that retail industry efforts continue to drive client innovation efforts and that retail business and IT teams indeed demand shorter time-to-value benefits for their technology investment efforts. Clearly stated was that the era of two-year consulting and system integration windows are over.  Retail clients can and will no longer tolerate such timelines.

Our impressions of the 2013 industry analyst event noted that a clear shortfall for Infosys was its ability to effectively market its broader array of capabilities among line-of-business and broad functional based manufacturing and retail audiences.  That impression remains even more poignant in 2014. Today’s customer panels included names we are not allowed to disclose under Safe-Harbor declaration, However, these customer executives provided comments regarding unexpected but positive discoveries of Infosys team capabilities and responsiveness to time-critical milestones. That, by our lens, is yet another indicator that  the Infosys leadership team clearly has to pay added attention to the firm’s overall marketing strategies specifically related to industry and functional support capabilities for both line of business as well as IT audiences.  World class technology delivery requires world-class presence and identity.

The takeaway for our readers is that while Infosys transcends into yet another period of renewal, this one appears at the surface to be more positive with deeper change management tenets.  Time will tell.

Bob Ferrari


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