subscribe: Posts | Comments | Email

Dassault’s Acquisition of Quintiq- Broader Simulation and Decision Support in Product Lifecycle Management

1 comment

Today Dassault Systemes announced the signing of a definitive share purchase agreement to acquire supply chain and operations planning software provider Quintiq for approximately €250 million ($338 million). Supply Chain Matters was somewhat surprised with this announcement, not with the fact that Quintiq was an attractive candidate for acquisition, but rather why other enterprise and ERP vendors had not pulled the trigger. Then again, the premium paid may account for this move.

Netherlands based Quintiq has dramatically increased its brand profile globally and specifically in the U.S. market. The company’s on premise and cloud-based software offerings include highly customized applications supporting operations, scheduling and supply chain planning, optimization and decision support. This provider boasts of over 500 implementations across 80 countries with many involving rather complex operations and supply chain planning needs.  Many of its applications have been highly customized to support rather unique business, operations and optimization needs.  It is one of very few planning support vendors having an installed base profile in areas such as air traffic control, airline and fleet scheduling, complex process and discrete industry scheduling needs. Co-Founder and CEO Dr. Victor Alles, an experienced computer scientist prides his company in solving planning puzzles that no one else can solve, hence Quitiq’s vertical industry coverage is extraordinary. Supply Chain Matters can attest to that passion after speaking directly with Dr. Allis in November.

With the tag line of the 3D Experience Company, France based Dassault Systemes provides technology to support product design, engineering, CAD modeling, simulation, data and process management process areas.  The current product portfolio is extensive and includes over 190,000 customers within 140 countries. Support for manufacturing industries includes aerospace and defense, engineering and construction, complex manufacturing, medical equipment and other areas.  The firms most high profile customer is Airbus but also includes names such as Medtronic, NASA, Rolls Royce and others.

According to the announcement, Quintiq is being positioned to expand Dassault’s DELMIA suite of offerings which is the product area focused on PLM Digital Manufacturing. This suite includes simulation software capabilities supporting product design, design creation, planning, monitoring and controlling of production processes. Thus, this is one of Dassault’s prime product focus area in supporting new areas of what The Economist coined as the “Third Industrial Revolution, which includes manufacturers leverage of the Internet of Things and Digitally Enabled Manufacturing. Dassault further provides a large services complement in areas of consulting, technology delivery, engineering and other services.  Thus it would appear that this acquisitions positions Quintiq as being strategically positioned to support customized planning and decision-support needs across the broad spectrum of product design production ramp-up, services and product end-of-life.

Of further interest is that this acquisition announcement comes a day after arch rival PTC announced another one of its IoT related acquisitions. Thus, by our view, both announcements are indicators that the PLM technology segment has aggressive intentions to be a player in the new wave of Digitally Enabled Manufacturing.  While each is taking different strategic approaches, the goal seems rather apparent, namely beat other enterprise and ERP focused vendors in depth of support in this new area of product centric decision-support that integrates physical and digital information elements. 

For Dassault specifically, the challenge will be to allow Quintiq to integrate with broader simulation and decision-support needs without being swallowed by complex corporate overhead and complexity.

The takeaway is an emerging new dawning of capabilities that allow manufacturers to integrate and simulate information and make more informed decisions that span the entire product lifecycle.

Bob Ferrari

© 2014 The Ferrari Consulting and Research Group LLC and the Supply Chain Matters Blog.  All rights reserved.


Another PTC Bold Move in Acquisition of Axeda to Ehance Internet of Things Technology Offerings

0 comments

In yet another reinforcement of the market potential and increased interest in the echnology support of the Internet of Things (IoT),  product and service lifecycle management technology provider PTC made another strategic investment to expand its product portfolio.

The company announced a definitive agreement to acquire privately held Axeda, an IoT cloud-based technology provider offering technology that connects machines and sensors to the cloud, for a reported $170 million in cash. According to an SEC filing, the merger agreement has been approved by the boards of both PTC and Axeda, and upon closing, Axeda will become a wholly-owned subsidiary of PTC. To finance this acquisition, PTC expects to borrow the full acquisition price.

The announcement follows the prior acquisition of IoT applications provider ThingWorx in December, which was the other strategic move into this new area of IoT and its relationships with both product and service lifecycle management.

Foxboro Massachusetts based Axeda is a privately-held company with majority ownership from JMI Equity which dominates its Board. The core of Axeda technology is the ability to establish secure cloud-based connectivity and management across a wide range of machines, sensors and devices. The Axeda IoT platform is described as a “complete M2M and IoT data integration and applications development platform” that includes connectivity, data management, and device and asset management support services. Axeda Connected Machine Management Applications provide support in the monitoring, remote access, content distribution, configuration and dashboard reporting of various M2M applications.

Support of business needs include technicians remotely diagnosing and servicing ATM’s, medical devices and industrial equipment. The company’s web site cites installed base customers in Industrial manufacturing such as Sealed Air and Tyco, high tech manufacturers such as EMC and NetApp, among others, and a fairly long listing of medical device manufacturers that include Medtronic, Phillips, Siemens and Waters. Strategic partners are AT&T, Microsoft, SAP, and WiPro, among others. In June of last year, WiPro invested an undisclosed amount in the company to secure premium partner access to technology resources along with the ability to test further and deploy M2M technology applications from the WiPro M2MCenter of Excellence in Bangalore.

Of further interest, Axeda CEO Todd DeSisto’s background is cited as “service as a senior executive for multiple venture and private equity companies with successful exits.”

According to PTC, the prime motivation for this acquisition was to complement the ThingWorx rapid application development environment by addressing customer needs for connectivity and security.  In the briefing with equity analysts, PTC management boasted about the current strong growth already encountered in ThinWorx related bookings which were described as the equivalent of $4 million in equivalent license revenues during the past quarter. President and CEO James Heppelmann described the Axeda acquisition as “the best deal we’ve done in a long time”.  He further noted that much of the current IoT interest for embarking on IoT initiatives is coming directly from C-level executives who are pondering the potential to reconfigure existing product value-chains.

Supply Chain Matters attended the recent PTC Live Global customer conference in June where many customer presentations addressed the IoT scenarios for connecting product and service management business process needs directly with information on physical devices. Our sense was that these new forms of applications are clearly in early stages of development yet attendees were drawn to some of the sessions, including those that addressed the linkage of machine sensing with service management processes.

PTC has made yet another bold move to lock-up a promising technology platform.  Supply Chain Matters reiterates our impressions communicated with the prior ThingWorx acquisition. namely that this move adds another arrow in PTC’s ongoing efforts to compete with far larger enterprise software vendors in supporting a rather broad and extensive product and service management product suite that has the potential to leverage the new era of digital based manufacturing.

Bob Ferrari

© 2014 The Ferrari Consulting and Research Group LLC and the Supply Chain Matters Blog.  All rights reserved.


Breaking Technology News: PTC and Dassault Systemes Make Significant Acquisition Announcements of Axeda and Quintiq

0 comments

This week is turning out to be rather significant within the area of product lifecycle management (PLM), manufacturing and service management technology. Two major technology providers, PTC and Dassault Systemes have announced noteworthy acquisitions in conjunction with the formal reporting of quarterly financial results.

PTC announced a definitive agreement to acquire privately held Axeda, an Internet of Things (IoT) and cloud-based technology provider offering technology that connects machines and sensors to the cloud, for a reported $170 million in cash. The announcement follows the acquisition of IoT applications provider ThingWorx in December.

Dassault Systemes announced the signing of a definitive share purchase agreement to acquire supply chain and operations planning software provider Quintiq for approximately €250 million ($338 million).  This acquisition is noted as extending Dassault’s 3DEXPERIENCE platform, specifically expanding the DELMIA brand into business operations planning

In the view of Supply Chain Matters, both announcements indicate that the PLM technology segment has aggressive intentions to extend and integrate product and service management software applications with advanced technology related to connecting physical devices with business operations planning.  However, each of these acquiring vendors is taking somewhat different approaches.

Given the significance of both of these important announcements, Supply Chain Matters will feature subsequent dedicated commentaries focused on each.

Bob Ferrari

 


Where is Apple’s Commitment to U.S. Manufacturing?

0 comments

Our previous Supply Chain Matters commentary noted that Apple is in the process of marshalling its vast supply chain scale in ramping-up for the pending introduction of new iPhone and other products while stoking consumer demand for the upcoming holiday buying surge. Upwards of 110,000 or considerably more additional workers are being marshalled to support production ramp-up while suppliers themselves reap the benefits of orders exceeding 100 million units.

In December 2012, Apple CEO Tim Cook conducted a series of orchestrated media interviews that included an announcement that Apple planned to invest upwards of $100 million to build Mac computers in the U.S. Our Supply Chain matters commentary at that time reflected on one interview conducted by NBC News anchor Brain Williams. Below is an excerpt of that commentary:

There were statements by Cook that, in our view, were somewhat on the mark and deserve amplification.  Brian Williams asked in the Rock Center interview- What would be the financial impact to the product if, for example, the production of iPhones were shifted to the U.S.?  Cook’s response was that rather than a price impact, the real issues reflect a skills challenge.  Skills were identified as the existence of talented manufacturing process engineers, as well as experienced manufacturing workers.  Cook pointed to deficiencies in the U.S. educational system, as well as the ongoing challenge of recruiting skilled manufacturing workers in the U.S.  Great answer!  But perhaps, there is much more unstated.  High tech and consumer electronics firms long ago shifted the core of consumer electronics supply chains to Asia. Foxconn alone represents a production workforce of over a million people, not to mention many more of that number spread across Apple’s Asian based suppliers. Add many other consumer electronics companies and the arguments of existing capabilities in people, process, component product innovation and supply chain across Asia remain compelling.

We recall that commentary in light of yet another major ramp-up of Asia based consumer electronics supply chain providers.  Yet, the open question remains, where or what is the status of Apple’s planned $100 million investment in the U.S. let alone a more far reaching commitment toward renewing a U.S. based consumer electronics component supply chain ?

A posting in All Things Digital in May of 2013 indicated that according to testimony from CEO Tim Cook before a Congressional Subcommittee the Mac facility would be located in Austin Texas and rely on components made in Florida and Illinois and equipment produced in Kentucky and Michigan. Soon after, Apple contract manufacturing partner Foxconn announced that it was looking to source more manufacturing in the U.S.

In June of this year, PC World made note that Cook tweeted a photo of his visit to the Austin Texas facility where Macs are being produced. The snafu was the iMac in the background was running Microsoft Windows.

The problem however is that a Google search to find updated information related to Apple’s investment in U.S. supply chain capability yields scant information.  We certainly urge our readers with knowledge of Apple’s U.S. production and supply chain investment efforts to chime in, if they are allowed.

Compare that with the efforts being generated by Wal-Mart in its Made in the U.S.A. initiative, committing upwards of $250 over the next ten years on U.S. produced goods. During the Winter Olympics, Wal-Mart produced a super slick video, I am A Factory, that garnered over a million You Tube views. That has been followed by summit meetings held with would-be suppliers in multiple product categories to encourage U.S. investment and provide assistance in sourcing or skills development training. Wal-Mart is even willing to make multiple year buying commitments to prospective manufacturers to help them invest in U.S. based supply chain resources. Last week, the Wall Street Journal profiled Element Electronics which is currently assembling televisions in a production facility in South Carolina under the Wal-Mart program. Noted is that the Element production line is an exact duplicate of one that exists in China, installed by Chinese engineers. While Element management admits that there are challenges in the sourcing of a U.S. component supply chain, and in required worker skills, it is making efforts to correct that situation over time under the support of Wal-Mart’s longer term buying commitment.

The point is this.  There is no question that Apple has the financial resources and the public relations savvy to make a U.S. production and supply chain sourcing effort far more meaningful, impactful and visible.  Yet one has to dig real deep to find information let alone acquire any sense of active commitment. Instead, business headlines note massive scale-up and flexibility of Asia based resources as being far more important to Apple’s business goals. Yet Apple has no problem in demanding a premium price for its products from U.S. consumers. We will avoid diving into the debate regarding Apple’s offshore cash strategy.

Supply Chain Matters therefore challenges the top rated supply chain to join Wal-Mart and others in a far more active and impactful multi-year commitment to U.S. manufacturing which includes higher volume products and education of required worker skills.

Bob Ferrari

 


Once Again Another Apple New Product Ramp-up of the iPhone Supply Chain

0 comments

On the eve of Apple’s report of quarterly earnings, its supply chain is leaking all sorts of information regarding the upcoming new production ramp-up of Apple’s new iPhone models in preparation for all important the holiday buying surge period that comes later this year.

Our Supply Chain Matters information alerts regarding Apple have been active for the past five weeks but the trigger point arrived today when the Wall Street Journal featured a front-page article regarding ongoing production plans.

According to the WSJ, Apple’s supply chain planners have placed orders for between 70 million and 80 million iPhones in both 4.7 inch and 5.5 inch screen configurations to be completed by the end of this calendar year. That compares to production orders of between 50-60 million phones for the same period last year as Apple ramped-up for the introduction of the iPhone5 model series. That is an obvious indication that Apple is making big-bets on the expected popularity of the new iPhone models. Apple also does not want to encounter a situation of being short on inventory for the most popular iPhone 5s model, as was the case during last year’s holiday season.

The WSJ report generally correlates with reports from Taiwan media several weeks ago. Where the reports differ is when volume production is scheduled to start.  Media outlets in Taiwan reported that the 4.7 inch model would begin volume production this month, while the 5.5 inch would begin production in mid-August.  Today’s WSJ report indicates the larger screen version production would begin in September. Previous Taiwan and Chinese reports indicated that contract manufacturer Foxconn was in the process of hiring an additional 100,000 workers to accommodate the cyclical production increase while secondary contract manufacturer Pegatron was in the process of hiring an incremental 10,000 workers. All of this data provides a sense of the sheer scale and flexibility that Apple requires from its supply chain partners.

What is remarkable is that a reading of today’s report gives a true sense of the complexity and variability challenges that Apple’s supply chain planners must manage.  The new larger screen is again, as in prior years, presenting production ramp-up and yield challenges due to more advanced in-call technology and a rumored sapphire based screen. The WSJ report indicates that orders for upwards of 120 million displays have been placed to compensate for yield challenges. If that number is accurate, it would imply that planners are factoring a 60 percent yield factor. The report further validates that Apple planners will make production adjustments based on early demand history, which was again demonstrated last year when production volumes for the iPhone 5c were scaled-back based on initial demand from consumers. Last month, China Times reported that global semiconductor chip producer TSMC was expected to produce 120 million touch ID fingerprint sensors for Apple, which is three times the volume produced last year, and a further indication of production yield factors and ramp-up scale.

Then there is the celebration of the Lunar New Year, which next year, arrives in February, when most production grinds to a halt as workers take time to return to their families. Apple planners must insure that adequate inventories remain to compensate for a lull in production, or that contract manufacturers make assurances that some production will continue during the period of the Lunar New Year celebration. Multi-tiered inventory visibility is an obvious necessity.

As was the case last year, Apple’s upcoming new product launches will place its supply chain with even more challenges. The competitive stakes for Apple are far higher this year as market dynamics and overall competition in emerging markets intensifies. Rival Samsung has already felt the effects of intensified competition from lower-price producers Lenovo and Xiaomi in China and Micromax and Karbonn in India. 

Pricing strategy will be critical and some reports indicate that Apple is seeking higher list prices from carriers for its upcoming new models.  The government of China recently raised media-wide concerns regarding the overall security of Apple smartphones in the midst of ongoing global spying scandals, which could place additional pressures on China Mobile to feature other brands. Android powered phones continue to gain more overall market share while Microsoft and other tech players are providing more incentives for lower-cost providers to adopt Windows based phones.

These are all variables that will drive Apple’s supply chain planning in the coming weeks, one that will again have to demonstrate responsiveness to increased market dynamics, synchronization of NPI and ramp-up plans and resiliency to unplanned disruptions or material shortages.

Then again, Apple continues to be rated by Gartner as the number one supply chain.

Bob Ferrari


Boeing Shares Current Reliability Performance of 787 Dreamliners

0 comments

In our previous published commentary, we reflected on the recently held Farnborough Air Show and the new order activity generated for aerospace industry supply chains by this trade show.  Boeing 787-9

One other report from this trade show caught our attention. Boeing indicated that the reliability to-date of the more than 160 787 Dreamliners that are operating among global carriers is averaging about 98 percent. The OEM’s chief 787 test pilot flatly indicated: “that number is not where we would like it to be, we were expecting it to increase.” The industry sets reliability benchmarks for aircraft, particularly newly introduce models that must meet higher customer expectations. According to reporting from the Wall Street Journal, Boeing pegs reliability of new aircraft to that of the previous generation 777 fleet at comparable times of product rollout and fleet operating time. The “triple seven” has been widely recognized as one of the most reliable.

Thus far, 787’s have logged more than 490,000 hours of service, but a series of various ongoing snafu’s or malfunctions have caused some setbacks with both production volumes of new aircraft as well as operation of existing aircraft. However, Boeing officials report that the situation is improving. With its latest new “dash nine” variant of the 787, Boeing has further taken on more design management to insure overall reliability of system components. 

The report itself provides yet another reminder of the very high overall reliability standards that today’s more advanced and technology laden aircraft must meet.  It is also a reinforcement to the overall criticality of integration of product design with physical and software performance. Not many industries with such a complex hardware, software and bill-of-materials complexity can meet the standards of 98 percent reliability let alone even higher levels.

Bob Ferrari


« Previous Entries