Thus far, we have posted deep-dives on the first nine of our 2017 Predictions for Industry and Global Supply Chains.  The one prediction remaining is our final Prediction Ten, which for each year, dives into what we foresee as unique industry-specific supply chain challenges or environments for the coming year.

As Editor, I have also decided for the purposes of brevity and reader interest, to present each industry in a separate Supply Chain Matters blog posting. We will be also posting these industry-specific predictions in a faster cadence.

In prior industry-specific predictions posting, we dived into Automotive Supply Chain Residing Across North America.

We then dived into Commercial Aerospace Manufacturing Supply Chains.

Next came B2C, B2B-to-C and Traditional Retail Focused Supply Chains.

We then moved to Apparel and Footwear Producers and Respective Supply Chains.

Next-up:

Pharmaceutical and Drug Supply Chains _DSC0083

For the first time, we are including pharmaceutical and drug supply chains in our industry-specific predictions for 2017. The principal reasons are twofold and somewhat inter-related. The increasingly global reach of the industry’s various supply chains is adding continued possibilities for risk and disruption. Second, within the U.S. especially, there remains an enormous groundswell of political and social backlash directed at what is perceived as artificially high and inflated pricing stemming from conflicting buyer self-interests across the industry’s extended supply chain.

Global Sourcing

Today’s manufacturing and drug capacity profiles among proprietary or generic drug brands span countries such as Ireland, India, Israel, China, Singapore, and the United States. Some produce drugs for their immediate regions, while many export globally. Of late, there has been a shift of manufacturing away from the U.S. to take advantage of lower manufacturing cost and tax savings. The bulk of active pharmaceutical ingredients, the primary raw material compounds related to other drugs, are sourced in China and India.

According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, the United States is now the biggest importer of pharmaceuticals from other countries. Incidents of counterfeit drugs and medicines have been a constant challenge and lately, conformance to generally accepted production practices have become troublesome from production facilities across India, where many generic drug production facilities are located. The government of India recently cited 200 India based drug manufacturers for high risk in compliance standards.

Ongoing Business Challenges

In 2011, the industry reeled from an average of over 250 shortages of critical drugs as monitored by the U.S. Federal Drug Administration.  Much has been accomplished to alleviate drug shortages since that time but continued work remains. As of the end of January 2017, the FDA was reporting 57 drug shortages, the bulk of which were included in categories such as Pediatric Medicine (26), Oncology (6), Gastroenterology (9), Endocrinology (6), among others.

For years, the industry has danced around or delayed responses to mandates for implementing item-level traceability and tracking of life-saving drugs and medicines. By November 2017, pharmaceutical companies will be required to mark their products with a National Drug Code (NDC), serial number, lot number and expiration date in both machine-readable and human-readable format according to the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA) of 2013. A diverse group of 44 companies, from manufacturers to wholesalers to solution providers, have further come together to develop updated GS1 guidelines on the use of GS1’s Electronic Product Code Information Services (EPCIS) for lot-level management and item-level traceability of pharmaceuticals. DSCSA is planned to be implemented over the next 10 years in three different phases while companies are transitioning their systems and preparing for the various requirements. Ten years is a considerable amount of time and some on the customer and patient side continue with frustrations as to the industry’s overall progress.

This is an industry that continues to demonstrate a general lack of common goal collaboration across an extended supply chain with conflicting stakeholder interests. Thus, the challenge of business transformation or faster momentum can continue to be bogged down.

A recent wave of high-profile, large global-scale mergers and acquisitions have further disrupted individual supply chains in areas of assimilating business and supply chain processes, procurement software systems technology and talent.

Geopolitical Forces

The new Trump Administration and the U.S. Congress have cited the pharmaceutical and drug industry in the context for both new healthcare care reform, excessive drug pricing and in current sourcing practices of drugs globally. In late January 2017, President Trump, at a meeting in the White House with a group of high-lever pharmaceutical drug company executives, indicated that he wanted more manufacturing to occur in the United States.

As noted in our other industry-specific predictions, if the U.S. Congress were to adopt business tax reform legislation that could impose a multi-industry import tax, pharmaceutical and drug companies importing raw compounds and medicines could be financially impacted. We therefore predict the need for a lot of product sourcing scenario planning and analysis in the coming months.

For all the above, we include pharmaceutical and drug supply chains in our 2017 Industry Unique prediction category.

 

This concludes our Supply Chain Matters series of ten 2017 Predictions for Industry and Global Supply Chains, predicting a year that promises to be:

  • Consumed by global uncertainty
  • Somewhat challenged in terms of supporting business top-line growth
  • Sure to place supply chain sourcing teams in constant scenario analysis and business advisor roles to senior management
  • Noticeably higher in the supply chain risk potential

Again, our goal is to provide clients and blog readers insights and helpful information in setting agendas and initiatives for the existing year. Throughout 2017, Supply Chain Matters will be publishing periodic updates related to each of our predictions.

Our full 44-page Research Advisor Report is now available for complimentary downloading in our Research Center. We do ask that you provide basic contact information as well as a valid email address and phone number. As a reminder, we do not sell or offer reader and contact information to any third-party.

If we can be of any assistance to your organization in the coming year, give us a call or email us at: info <at> supply-chain-matters <dot> com .

Bob Ferrari

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