In a mid-December posting, Supply Chain Matters called attention to a media report indicating that a component shortage within the commercial aerospace sector that was suspected of causing delayed shipments of brand new Airbus and Boeing airplanes. According to this Bloomberg report, France based Zodiac Aerospace, a supplier of upscale lie-flat airline seats was struggling to meet its delivery requirements for such premium aircraft seats. A month-long labor stoppage within a Texas production facility that ended in late October coupled with backlogged engineering teams working with airlines for final seat design approvals have led up to these late deliveries.

This week brings a new and even more noteworthy development. According to a published Reuters report, the head of Airbus’s passenger jet business called attention to suppliers of cabin equipment, indicating their failure to get to grips with chronic production delays was “unacceptable”.  A320_Vueling_Cabin

Here is the quote to a group of industry journalists:

I think the cabin equipment suppliers would do well to have an equivalent level of industrial maturity to that of aircraft manufacturers. They are big industrial companies now, they are not small companies, so they must put in place measures to meet their obligations. It is becoming unacceptable”

While Fabrice Bregier, the CEO of Airbus’s passenger jet division reportedly did not single out any one supplier, he was apparently responding to a question about French seat maker Zodiac, according to Reuters. Further noted is that both Airbus and Boeing have now positioned more people in Zodiac factories to help overcome the delays, and are insisting on vetting Zodiac seat sales as an ‘exception’ to their catalogs, according to industry sources.

As our supply chain community well knows, when frustration levels regarding the reliability of a supplier reaches the CEO level in a public lambasting, the crap has hit the fan and frustration levels have probably reached the boiling point.

Perhaps we can speculate that the CEO of a certain supplier, or multiple suppliers have been on the phone and in the air attempting to perform damage control and make assurances that all outstanding and future commitments will be performed to expectations.

Not a pleasant situation to be in, particularly in an industry with multiple years of backlogged customer orders for completed airplanes. It’s a slippery slope when a preferred vendor effects actions that are deemed “not acceptable to a level of industrial maturity.”

Bob Ferrari