Supply Chain Matters has featured significant prior commentary focused on aerospace and commercial aircraft focused supply chains.  A lot of our focus was on the OEM tier, namely global producers Airbus and Boeing, along with mid-tier OEM’s such as Bombardier, Embraer and CMAC. While we have featured commentary or highlighted developments on various larger-scale suppliers, candidly, we should have provided more in-depth perspectives of various other tiered suppliers.

What has prompted us to this candid conclusion was last week’s published Seattle Times article, Low Wages for Aerospace Workers Despite Tax Breaks for Employers.  After analysis of Washington state data, the Seattle Times reports: “In 2013, outside of Boeing, a third of production workers at local aerospace parts manufacturers- companies that get tax breaks intended to preserve good jobs in the state- earned between $10 and $15 per hour.” That level, equivalent to $31,200 annually, represents the minimum wage level for Seattle. Once more, the report reminds readers that aerospace companies in the state of Washington are entitled to a 40 percent reduction in taxes on corporate revenues for the intention of “providing jobs with good wages and benefits.”

The report describes what is termed the “Boeing squeeze”, that being constant pressure to reduce the cost of component parts. A spokesperson of the Pacific Northwest Aerospace Alliance (PNAA), a trade group of local suppliers indicated to the Times that passing higher wage costs up the line “would encourage Boeing to take the work elsewhere.” Once more, suppliers seem divided on dealing with such a situation, with some indicating that the skills and education required for such production jobs do not warrant higher pay. This report highlights specific conditions and/or examples (pro and con) among local suppliers:

AIM Aerospace

Aviation Technical Services (ATS)

Aero-Plastics

Carlisle Interconnect Technologies (CIT)

Hytek Finishes

Zodiac Cabin & Structures Support

In previous Supply Chain Matters commentaries we have highlighted reports of industry supplier bullying. While many would like to believe that certain supply chains have moved away moved away from squeezing the cost-reduction burden down the value-chain, these types of reports continue to indicate that such practices linger.  Once more, having participants within a multi-billion dollar industry in the enviable position of having in-demand and technology innovative products resulting in upwards of ten years of unfulfilled customer orders would continue to practice squeeze tactics on suppliers would seem to indicate that supplier partnerships and collaboration remain a one-way lens. Why are so many production workers being asked to live and raise families on a minimum wage?

Shame on us for not paying closer attention to developments within all of the tiers of aerospace supply chains. We will do our part to change that including reaching out and researching more mid-market suppliers.

We however would suggest that the large OEM’s would take a similar perspective and examine how supplier practices impact the entire value chain, particularly those involving and setting a role model for social responsibility.

Bob Ferrari