In late January, we alerted our Supply Chain Matters blog readers of a published report from The Wall Street Journal indicating that global contract manufacturer Foxconn, (Hon Hai Precision Corp.) new parent of Sharp Corp. was evaluating a $7 billion in new LCD manufacturing facility in the United States. Our takeaway from this report was that if this investment did indeed occur, it would represent a significant milestone for the high-tech and consumer electronics supply chains. We believed that the plant investment would further have a linkage to Apple’s production needs. 

Since that time, there have been various reports indicating on and off again negotiations with individual U.S. states. Last week, the Associated Press, citing an informed source, indicated that Foxconn’s proposed U.S. factory might have a Wisconsin address and that active negotiations with state officials was occurring. The report indicated that the state of Michigan was also a possibility.

Today, the investment advisory site Seeking Alpha, Reuters and other news outlets are now indicating that a final decision is expected in July.

According to Seeking Alpha, the total investment is $10 billion across the United States, beginning with a $7 billion LCD factory. The July decision will likely determine whether Wisconsin or Michigan are the likely site for the factory.

Foxconn CEO Terry Gou has indicated that five other states are under consideration for Foxconn investments including Ohio, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, and Texas.

Reuters reports that Gau indicated to shareholders:

This time we go to America, it’s not just to build a factory, but to move our entire supply chain there.

Prior reports were indicating that Gau was playing hardball in his ongoing negotiations with individual states, in-essence threatening to continue the process until favorable terms to Foxconn were evident. In the latest Reuters report, Cau is now quoted as indicating he has been favorably impressed, beyond imagination, with the sincerity and confidence by individual state governors to attract investment.

If readers are noting a subtle political tone to these events, you are not alone. Many of the states noted under consideration, including the two finalists voted favorably for President Trump is the last election. The final announcement, when made, will resonate well with “Make America Great Again” voters.

Politics aside, make no mistake that this is a very big deal for high-tech and consumer electronics supply chains, specifically Apple’s supply chain, along with that of U.S. Based automotive brand owners that increasingly feature more high-tech electronics, autonomous driving features and visual displays in future automobile models.

A very big deal indeed.

 

Bob Ferrari

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